Household Sewing Machine Company 1882 | Home Design Ideas


Into Or Out Of The Envelope Laurel Cottage Genealogy

The New Home Sewing Machine Co. of Orange, Massachusetts. Two 100 h. p. boilers furnish steam heat and there are two 80 h. p. boilers and two engines kept in reserve in case of need. Water power from Millers river is generally used, and for this purpose there are seven turbine water wheels equal to 300 horse power,

By 1924 the White Sewing Machine Company acquired the Domestic Sewing Machine Co and incorporated many of their premises, factories and equipment into White's. By the 1930's production slowed down considerably and from then until 1950 they were simply badge sold machines under White's (but green machines).

i have an antique sewing machine made by new home, model 6 as it reads on the sewing machine. its all manual with the foot pedal, all cast iron stand and the cabinet ihas two drawers on either side, one side cabinets are missing.it reads patent applied for g 4903. what is its value and manufacture date?

Household Treadle Sewing Machine. This Household treadle sewing machine, manufactured by the Providence Tool Company was probably made by sometime between 1874 and 1879. If you look closely at the foot treadle below you can locate initials PTC of the company that made the machine. We found this gem, complete with accessories, in a New York thrift store for the great price of $20.

14 feb. 2014- Andrew J. Clark & William P. Barker Est 1860 - 1865 became A. J. Clark 1865 - 1867 became A. F. Johnson & Co. 1867 - 1869 became Gold Medal Sewing Machine Co. Incorporated 1869 - 1882 became New Home Sewing Machine Co. Est 1882 became Incorporated into the Free Sewing Machine Co. 1930 became Part of Janome Established in 1860 by Johnson, Clark & Co. to manufacture sewing machines.

Thomas White, founder of the White Sewing Machine Company, began building sewing machines in 1858, according to the International Sewing Machine Collectors' Society's website, ismacs.net. By 1882, the company was producing about 60,000 machines each year. Between the early 1930s through the 1950s, White was the sole